Psalm 119 — A Psalm of Devotion to God

The 119th Psalm contains a range of sentiments, thoughts, emotions, states of mind. It speaks of affliction, of persecution, of trouble, anguish, sorrow and despondency, of pleading for relief and salvation, but also of hope, of rejoicing, of indignation towards evil, of assurance, of faith, of determination to resist evil and obey God, and of thanksgiving.

It seems to touch on almost the entire range of circumstances and emotions that a person of faith might experience over a lifetime. But the emphasis throughout the entire psalm is on a love of God’s word, seeking after it, and being faithful to it.

Discover some important lessons as we review the powerful words of Psalm 119.

“Palm 119 — A Psalm of Devotion to God” COGMessenger is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Jesus Our Teacher

Jesus came as a teacher, as well as for other purposes. Jesus’ students are called disciples. Rod Reynolds explains from the Bible what it means to be a true disciple of Jesus Christ.

Jesus Our Teacher” COGMessenger is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

The Blessing of Truth

Rod Reynolds explains the importance of the blessing of truth, and what truth is. Though rare in today’s world, God wants everyone to have it, and he will see that in due time the world is confronted with this blessing on a universal scale.

The Blessing of Truth” COGMessenger is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

The Path To Salvation—Part 3

The Bible teaches that God has a plan of salvation for mankind. What does that mean, and why is a plan of salvation necessary? What is it that human beings need to be saved from? If there is a “plan of salvation,” what is it? Are there specific steps to be followed on the path to salvation?

In previous articles, parts one and two of a series, I addressed the first seven of the following questions relating to salvation for human beings:

(1) What is “salvation”?; (2) Are “good” people saved even if they don’t know about Christ, or are unbelievers?; (3) Are infants and babies saved, even though they know nothing of Christ and lack the capacity to choose good or evil?; (4) Does the Bible teach “Universal Salvation”?; (5) Who qualifies you for salvation?; (6) Can one, after making a profession of faith in Christ, and receiving the Holy Spirit, be disqualified from salvation?; (7) Are those who do not attain salvation in this age eternally condemned?; (8) What is the path to salvation?

In this article, part three of this series, we conclude the final question: “What is the path to salvation?”

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Jesus Our Savior

When the people of Israel were enslaved in Egypt they were living under a very powerful government. While in Egypt they were forced to live under the rule of Pharaoh – who was not only king but considered by the Egyptians to be a god as well. The Israelites were oppressed by the laws of Egypt and the whims of its ruler – Pharaoh (Exodus 3:7). To escape the oppression of Pharaoh in Egypt, they needed a Savior.

Egypt typifies the rule of sin – the law of sin which operates in the flesh – and in the fleshly mind (Romans 7:23). This law, rule or dominion of sin which operates in the flesh is something we must overcome in order to please God.

Yet within our own flesh, within our fleshly minds, we simply do not have the power of and by ourselves to cast out the law of sin that rules us. The fleshly mind is too weak to exercise dominion and power over sin, even if it wants to. That’s what Paul is referring to when he writes in Romans 7:23 about the law in our fleshly members warring against the mind, and bringing us into captivity to the law of sin.

Just as without God – without a Savior – the Israelites were in captivity, in bondage to the law of Egypt, so our flesh without a spiritual savior is in bondage to the law, dominion and rulership of sin. Even with the Old Covenant, wherewith the laws of God were written on tablets of stone, but not written in their hearts and minds, the Israelites were powerless to break the dominion of sin in their lives (Deuteronomy 5:29; 10:1-5; Romans 2:27-29; Jeremiah 31:33; Mark 7:6). In the same way, our human flesh of itself is powerless to break the bondage of sin.

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